• Originators: Angimoto
  • Originators: Angimoto
  • Originators: Angimoto

Art

Originators: Angimoto

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Pick up Issue 52 or 53, flip it around and understand that we have a deep appreciation for art here. It’s why we let artists design our back cover. We began as a graffiti zine, and as our scope widened to other art forms, so did our interest in art itself. In line with that sentiment, we bring you Originators, an ongoing series that profiles visual artists working behind the scenes to produce the art, television, and work we can only describe as dope.

Andrew “Angimoto” Douglas is a man whose art is birthed from the cutest Japanese cartoons, sprinkled with random bits of video games and finished with a large amount of the Internet. Let’s also not forget the heaping serving of the finest of junk food that accounts for Angimoto really bringing out his talent. The elusive illustrator’s work could be described as cartoony, using loads of greens and blues for his short paneled comics and bright illustrations. Dude’s a madman when it comes to illustrative work, and more recently, creating pixel-art reminiscent of old-school 8-bit video games.

Angimoto has comics circulating like crazy on Tumblr and various gaming-related blogs. A bulk of his work is completely derived from anime and Nintendo games, paying homage to games like “Animal Crossing,” “Earthbound,” and “Star Fox.” He’s done work for the video game/comedy troupe Mega64, clothing company Hari Kari, and punk group Math the Band. His various webcomics depict the blurs of life and anime, and aid in the glorification of pizza and junk.

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Mass Appeal: What do you do?

Andrew Douglass: I don’t even know. I get asked that way too often, and most of the time, I have to remind myself that people are looking at what I’m doing.

MOST of the time, I’m just trying to explore new ways of doing new art things. I only illustrate what I like seeing, from start to finish. I don’t like the idea of peddling around for three days working on a single sketch. Maybe I just work fast, I guess.

MA: How would you describe your own art?

AD: Do I have to be profound?

MA: No.

AD: I don’t know; colorful, simple. [It] changes based on my mood. The most childish way I could go about expressing my completely unchildish feelings.

MA: What is your inspiration?

AD: Probably all the cartoons and games that I watched growing up. I would watch VHS tapes over and over until I could recite them. And while a lot of those cartoons were big time Don Bluth or Disney flicks, MOST of them were just terrible, colorful, eroded tapes from some reclaim bin somewhere. I mean, as a kid, I thought they were amazing, but growing up I started to wonder how SO many of them even got made.

And yeah, when my parents finally broke down and got me a [Sega] Genesis. It took them three hours to figure out how to connect it to my big stupid tube TV.

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MA: What games did you have?

AD: “Sonic the Hedgehog 2,” “Radical Rex,” and “Mickeys’ Magical Woods” or whatever — I never got past like the second level of that. That’s all the entertainment I needed. I mean, “Sonic” and “Radical Rex” were both colorful, wacky… It’s not so much the game that inspired me, but the crazy colors and patterns that would zip through the screen.

MA: And the way the games looked got you into illustration?

AD: I mean, ask any artist my age on the Internet what inspires them and it’s probably going to be similar.

The only reason I got so into digital art and color exploration is because growing up in Mississippi, there weren’t a lot of comic book stores, like, at all. I grew up in a household that always had a BIG FAT BOOK beside the toilet; “A WORLD IN ART” or “THE COMPLETE HISTORY OF FINE ART.” It was full of these dark, washed out portraits from the 15th century that my dad could recite off the top of his head, and although my parents were super, super supportive of me being an artist, what that means in the south is being a junior college professor, high school “study hall” art teacher, or (if you’re lucky) a local folk art figure. But I hated dealing with 25 old blue-haired biddies who wanted me to paint their cabin, or their ugly grandkids.

MA: What’s next for you?

AD: Probably thinking about making a little zine of my Twitter doodles — 100×100 pixelated landscapes. These are only really just an excuse to throw vibrant colors around quickly.
But besides that there’s always a cool gig or two; a website or a band that I dig that wants something on a shirt, and that’s always fun too. I’m always buying new sketchbooks cause I’ll fill them up with crap that I think would cool on this or that.

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