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NY’s Hip-Hop Revival and The Megapixels That Created It

NY’s Hip-Hop Revival and The Megapixels That Created It

Action Bronson, the heavyweight Queens spitter made sure to come out of the gate like he was hosting the new season of Cash Cab. In “Barry Horowitz,” as soon as the beat drops, his Plymouth hard top is rollin’ underneath the BQE dime spots. In “Shiraz” the crazy’s lurking in the park could be from nowhere else but the outer boroughs. When Bronson brings the camera to Arthur Ave., while he’s picking up prosciutto, it is unmistakably New York.

“When you’re doing it, you’re thinking oh that’s a cool wall, or that’s a cool shot. You’re not necessarily concerned with the bigger meaning of what you’re doing. You just want to make sure the artist’s personality and the vibe of the song come across through the visuals.” – Alexander Richter, director of “Barry Horowitz”

“We’re really camera heavy because we’re both photographers,” adds Richter. “The way Tom [Gould] and I work is really involved with the artist, and kind of run and gun, because we aren’t setting up productions. It’s just capturing the personality like in photography.” Not being able to hide behind the production values traditionally associated with music videos has forced a more artist-driven form of music video. Viewers are now in the homes of these artists with their friends, and their personalities are constantly in the foreground. Richter says, “we always joke with Bronson that he’s gonna win a Grammy for his acting. He’s just this incredibly funny, and warm and larger than life and that comes across in the videos.” Bronson represents the grit of the everyday struggle, even when he’s serving up a feast with his dead ex-girlfriend as the centerpiece. The thread that runs through all of these videos is how normal they are, especially in their insanity.