Library of Congress Hip Hop

Library of Congress Disregards Hip Hop

This year the Library of Congress added 25 records to its national registry deemed to be culturally significant. Apparently, hip hop is not culturally significant.

Every year the Library of Congress adds an array of music to its national registry that they deem to be culturally significant. This year they added 25 new songs and albums, but failed to add any hip hop or rap. Despite hip hop’s growing popularity, only five hip hop songs have been included in the registry to date: Grandmaster Flash’s “The Message,” Tupac’s “Dear Mama,” Public Enemy’s “Fear of a Black Planet,” Da La Soul’s “3 Feet High and Rising,” and The Sugarhill Gang’s “Rappers Delight.”

In a recent interview, William Boone, professor of English and African-American Studies at Winston-Salem State University, discussed why hip hop artists are neglected by the Library of Congress, despite undisputable mainstream success. Boone also gave valid reasons for the inclusion of hip hop music into the registry;

“I think we have to come to grips with the fact that America is still struggling with certain things. Whether it be race, whether it be poverty, whether it be violence. And so I think hip-hop offers an exciting opportunity to look back on these moments — and not only chronicle history and culture in America, and the tension between generations and communities — I think it’s also a great American story in regards to the way young black folk, young poor folk, folk of color in America are grappling with these things: commercialism, hyperconsumption. These are things that are not only central to young people, but central to the American experience.”

If the registry is supposed to act as a time capsule, documenting American culture and politics through music, then hip hop is clearly one of the most important genres to include.

At Mass Appeal, we figured we would help the Library of Congress out, by offering some obvious choices we think they should consider including next year. Peep our list, and let us know what hip hop songs or albums you would like to see added to the national registry in the comment section.

Outkast Stankonia Cover
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NWA Straight Outta Compton
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Nas Illmatic
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A Tribe Called Quest The Low End Theory
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The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill
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Fugees The Score album artwork
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Boogie Down Productions Criminal Minded
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The Notorious BIG Ready to Die Cover
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Enter The Wu-Tang 36 Chambers Album Artwork
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RUN DMC Raising Hell
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Jay Z Reasonable Doubt Cover
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Eric B and Rakim Paid In Full
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[h/t NPR]

Library of Congress Hip Hop

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  • Jeremy Shatan

    It’s about time the Library Of Congress got on point. Besides a number of the ones you mention, Mobb Deep – The Infamous should be in there.

  • kdolo

    how is guru not on your list? or the roots?