SHARE

G.O.O.D. Music’s Holy War

G.O.O.D. Music’s Holy War

Good Friday Easter G.O.O.D. Friday 2012 G.O.O.D. Music Kanye West Pusha T 2 Chainz Big Sean

Happy Good Friday! For the past two years, Kanye West and his G.O.O.D. music fam-a-lam have made the Friday before Easter a musical event. Last year Kanye broke off from his hometeam to join forces with Jay-Z as a duo for Watch the Throne. Now the collective of Big Sean, Common, Pusha T, Kid Cudi, and Yeezy have re-formed like Voltron for an album’s worth of tracks, instead of the peace-meal posse cuts that leaked weekly in the fall/winter of 2010. With the release of the first posse cut, “Mercy” there’s a thread of holiness that goes back to “Lord, Lord, Lord.” We’re bridging the gap between then and now to show a little perspective. G.O.O.D. Music: The Album hits stores later this year. Peep the stats below.

Title: “Lord, Lord, Lord”

Date Released: September 17th, 2010. Part of Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Friday releases between August – December 2010.

Lenth: 7:31

Lineup: Mos Def (Yasiin Bey), Kanye West, Swizz Beatz, Raekwon, Charlie Wilson

Sample: Bryan Bennett “Solstice” (Ed. Note: Bennett’s sample also used by Nas on “Find Your Wealth” and in Supreme’s 2011 Fall/Winter campaign)

Quotable: “I got lines better than n****s albums—plural, king of the urban make your shit sound rural.” – Kanye West

Title: “Mercy”

Length: 5:32

Date Released: April 6th, 2012. Released during an actual Good Friday observance.

Lineup: Big Sean, 2 Chainz, Pusha T, Kanye West

Sample: Super Beagle “Dust A Sound Boy

Quotable: “Built a house up on that ass that’s an ass state.” – Big Sean

Conclusion: “Mercy” picks up where “Lord, Lord, Lord” left off, finding the resident G.O.O.D. Music team with more chemistry than the cherry-picked rappers for the G.O.O.D. Friday releases of the past. There are way more question marks floating over the Swizz and Mos verses, compared to the emphatic quotation marks that punctuate every featured rapper on “Mercy.” “Lord, Lord, Lord” is artistic for the poem of “observation” that starts out the first verse, but it eventually gets pretty flaccid by the time Swizz over-compensates by namedropping his riches. The fact that Charlie Wilson meanders for the last 2:15 of the track actually does more to erase the lackluster verses than it does to just fill space. That said, If “Mercy” is a sign of what next Friday has in store, then we’ll happily put that in our pipe and smoke it.