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Captain Morgan’s Love Boat

Captain Morgan’s Love Boat

Tracy Morgan Issue 40 Mass Appeal

Comedian Tracy Morgan Talks beats, rhymes and some of The best times of his life. Just don’t get him twisted.

Tracy Morgan is too legit to quit. Tracy Morgan is the shiznit. Tracy Morgan works real hard. Tracy Morgan has come real far…from the housing projects he came up in, up in the Bronx, New York. Legend has it that my man used to sell hot dogs at Yankee Stadium. Pay homage, hipsters and backpackers: money grip came up in the birthplace of hip hop at a time when crack was strong, but raps, parties and the fast life was even stronger. Some call the mid-to late 1980s the golden era of hip hop. I think anyone who contests this fact should get punched in the grill, then chest cavity.

Tracy is great because hip hop is great, and Tracy embodies one of the most important principles of the culture: originality. Sure, everybody’s got influences (interestingly enough, foul-mouthed fallen ’80s funny- man Andrew “Dice” Clay is one of Mr. Morgan’s influences) but Tracy’s talent is something hard to define or confine because it’s purely ‘o nat- ural. Face it: if duke was mopping up kangaroo sperm he’d be funny. It’s a gift. Something he was born with. It’s unfair. You can’t discred- it the man’s craft, though, and the man’s come a long way, baby paw, from starting humbly in the clubs, to “Def Comedy Jam” then on down the road to “Saturday Night Live,” where he made his biggest ripple as wacked-out nature boy Brian Fellow.

Mr. Morgan’s got a new DVD/CD jammie coming out, but he didn’t want to go into specifics because he said he didn’t want to jinx it. But look out for it everywhere soon. He’s got a new sitcom, too, but he didn’t want to get into maybe jinxing that, either. Still, sit back and soak up the real talk that oozes from this classic New Yorker’s lips. And pass that Moët (unless you’re an intern). Tracy Morgan is soooo Mass Appeal. Watch.

So you’re from the Bronx right?

Yeah man…heavy, heavy.

So talk to me about the ’80s, coming up in the BX. Hip hop, crack…

I thank God that I am who I am, and I was born when I was born ’cuz I almost missed real hip hop, ya know? I got to experience real hip hop, when it was fun, when it was in the clubs, when it was in the streets. I’m from Highbridge projects, right up the block from Yankee Stadium. Every summer when the Yankees would play, the stadium would light up the whole Bronx, ya know? I was there when [Boogie Down Productions’ DJ] Scott La Rock got killed, man. I grew up with KRS-ONE, Joey Crack [aka Fat Joe] and all of them, so I lived real hip hop.

Were you rapping back then?

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